GMMG - Greater Manchester Museums Group

GMMG - Greater Manchester Museums Group Show menu
Back Show search
Back

Ceramic Dish

late 19th Century

This is a dish from the Manchester Regiment.

It was owned by Company Sergeant Major John (Jack) Hurdley (155).

The symbols on the dish all have significance to the Regiment’s history:

On the left side of the dish is a depiction of the ‘Brunswick Star’, a symbol used by the Manchester Regiment partially reflecting the 63rd Regiment of Foot’s service in North America between 1775 and 1782, when they often rode as mounted infantry under the celebrated cavalry leader Colonel Tarleton.

At the top of the plate is a depiction of the ‘Sphinx’ with ‘Egypt’ beneath. This is a symbol used to remember fighting during the Egyptian campaign of 1801.

On the right of the dish is the ‘fleur-de-lys’. This symbol has been used by the Manchester Regiment and its forebears since the 1750s and worn as the Regiment’s cap badge between 1923 and 1958.

In the centre of the dish is the coat of arms of the City of Manchester.

Beneath the Coat of Arms is a scroll bearing the wording: ‘2nd Vol. Batt. The Manchester Regt’. This tells us this plate was part of a set commission by the Regiment’s 2nd Volunteer Battalion, sometime between 1888 and 1908, when that unit existed by that name.