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Pike

1839

The ‘Leighth Feight’ was a clash between Chartists, and police in King Street. It was a time of social unrest and the Chartists were demanding the right to vote to be extended to the working classes. There were three days of relatively peaceful protest marches to different Mills in the area with the protesters demanding that work be stopped.

On the third day, the protesters were, according to one witness, attacked by special constables. Soldiers from the old workhouse in King Street also chased the crowd away and a local squire, Squire Withington read the Riot Act from the obelisk in the square. It was the squire’s son who gave the pike to Thomas Boydell.

In his book “Further Notes and Recollections of Old Leigh” Thomas describes how the pike is reputed to have been confiscated by the police and soldiers who had been searching local houses after the infamous “Leighth Feight’’.